Joseph M. Delghingaro


Accountant/Business Analyst


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My Most Valuable Information

15 September 2013 | Category: Default | Author: Joe Delghingaro

 

What values mean the most to you?
 
This is an interesting question. Where it seems so simple, four small words have the power to define who and what a person is. By knowing what a person’s values are we can then have the foundation, not only, to understand the person but to predict how that person will act in a situation or even determine if they might not be telling the truth. Here are a few examples of the hundreds of possible values someone could have.
 
Acceptance
 
Approval
 
Belonging
 
Cleanliness
 
Devoutness
 
Eagerness
 
Family
 
Generosity
 
Inquisitiveness
 
Nonconformity
 
Science
 
Trustworthiness
 
Wealth
 
How can you use this to determine if someone is telling the truth? Take hypothetical Mike who loves his dog more than anything in the world and he is asked to tell a lie about his where-about’s that makes it impossible for him to walk his dog before going to work in the morning. His dog would be stuck all day having hold it, and if the dog did go Mike would know that his dog would feel terrible until Mike assured his dog it was ok. Is it very likely that Mike would neglect his responsibilities to his dog? No, unless it was a huge emergency that would not happen. It sounds obvious, but it’s a whole lot easier than trying to read peoples “tell” as seen on television shows. Understanding a person’s drive will really help you understand a person’s intentions. So, Who is Joe? What are Joe’s values?
 
I have two values that mean more to me than anything, honesty and openness. I feel they are the crux of all relationships: personal and business. It is when honesty is jeopardized that cruel intentions of man start playing off one another. As a metaphor, take a droplet of rain. Every droplet of rain forms from one tiny piece of particulate matter floating in the sky. Condensation forms around that particulate as it continues to grow until it falls. Now lets relate that to a personal relationship. You want to do something innocent with a friend, but your spouse wants you to come home because “them's the rules”. What’s it going to hurt? So you go out to your friends, but you have to produce the cover story, “I have to work late on this project”. Then next week, you really do have to work late on that project, and it snowballs and snowballs. Before you know it, nobody believes that you just wanted to hang out with a buddy.
 
Honesty prevents this from happening. Now your spouse is just mad at you. It’s openness from the beginning of the relationship that makes this work. For example, “I enjoy our time together, but I need to spend time with this person.” Or “I’m going come home and hate being here, and before you know it I’m just going to lie and not come here at all”. In relevant business terms “I would love to increase revenue on the forecast by 50K, but there is no substantiation behind it, in two weeks when I close the books we are going to miss forecasts by 50K, and I’m not going to be the hero today to be the loser tomorrow. Unless we can come up with a plan to get us from here to there.”
 
Openness is about letting everyone know your intentions from day one. I’ll admit, it’s hard for me to put my failures out there. Since openness and honesty are so important to me, I lick my wounds and show my scars. As Henry Ford said, "Failure is only the opportunity to begin again, only this time more wisely."
 
I am viewed as a good, ethical, trustworthy individual. My hard-rooted values of honesty and openness are the reason. Remember if you question someone’s true intentions, just ask yourself what do they value?

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